These are the Principles of Youth Parent Partnerships, created by a group of 500 youth in Durham, North Carolina in 1998.

Youth Engagement at Home

Youth engagement starts at home. This post offers some of my thoughts about that reality, as well as steps to ensuring that youth engagement happens in your family. I also share some of the experiences I’ve had with youth engagement at home.

 

Basic Thoughts

These are barriers to Youth Engagement at home identified by youth and parents in my last workshop.
These are some barriers to Youth Engagement at home identified by youth and parents in my last workshop.

 

I’ve started defining the word engagement as choosing the same thing over and over. There are many kinds of youth engagement at home:

  • Psychological engagement
  • Physical engagement
  • Emotional engagement
  • Intellectual engagement
  • Social engagement
  • Cultural engagement

…and so on. Within their homes, youth can be engaged with their families, including parents, siblings or other family members; their physical spaces like their bedrooms or backyards; activities like housework or video games; feelings like love and security; ideas like belonging and importance, and; many other things.

With all those possibilities, its easy to see how youth engagement starts at home. The elements of our family life determine how we engage with the world beyond our front door, including at school, in our communities, at work, in public, and everywhere else. If youth experience crappy engagement at home, youth are more likely to be disengaged in their lives – not always, all the time, but often in many ways.

Through my research and practice, I’ve found there are three things all parents can do to build youth engagement at home:

  • Listen to youth. Your offspring are yearning to be heard, no matter what age, what space and what condition your family is in. They might not show that desire, they might act the opposite of caring, and they might not be aware they have a voice—but they want to be heard.
  • Take action with youth. Don’t stop at listening to your kids—actually do things with them! Make, build, clean, connect and show your care and connection by being with youth directly, in each others’ spaces and sharing each others’ time.
  • Think about it. Youth engagement at home requires critical thinking about yourself, your parenting, your beliefs and your future. Is this how you want youth to live? Are these the things you want to do in your family? Be critical of your parenting and take action to change it.

As parents, we all screw up. The difference between the conscious parent and the unthinking parent is the energy they spend becoming more fair, just and equitable. We don’t want equality between youth and parents, we want equity. There’s a difference, and youth engagement at home makes us think about it.

 

My Experience

These are questions I asked related to Youth Parent Partnerships.
These are questions I asked related to Youth Parent Partnerships.

 

I’m a dad for four kids between the ages of 10 and 15. They are beautiful, strong-hearted kids full of all the challenge, vigor, suffering and joy of youth, and I love them. However, I screw up too, and I’ve learned to accept that. I learn a lot from my experience as a parent.

If you’ve followed me for a while, you’ve heard the tenants of my life: Childhood homelessness; family PTSD; Vietnam veteran father; poverty-stricken family that moved into low-income lifestyle; generational depression; minority neighborhood background; academic struggles; found my soulcraft at age 14; only kid in family to graduate high school on time; first in family to earn a bachelors degree; built my life’s work from The Freechild Project and SoundOut focused on youth engagement and Meaningful Student Involvement; wrote 50+ publications; spoke and taught and consulted around the world; still screwing up every day.

Throughout 2018, I’ve been facilitating the Parent-Youth Connections Seminar in King County, Washington, where Seattle is surrounded by suburbs, exurbs and more in all of its explosive boom-era angst and glory. Along the way, the community has chosen to investments on infants, children and youth throughout the county. One of these investments is through the King County Superior Courts, and its the program I’m facilitating.

For several years, the project taught parents and youth about youth development and adolescent brain development as a diversion to prevent youth incarceration. A successful project, it operated for several years and successfully kept a lot of young people out of jail.

Early this year, I was contracted to facilitate the program. In my initial contact with the courts, I explained that rather than taking the tact they’d traditionally espoused, I was going to veer toward youth engagement. These are some of my findings so far. There’ve been more than 100 participants in these 12-hour sessions so far, coming from a variety of racial, ethnic, cultural, linguistic and economic backgrounds.

Stay tuned as I learn more and start distilling all this into actionable change. My first product related to youth engagement at home is called the Parent Youth Engagement Seminar, and I’ll be launching it soon.

 


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Not What You Think

Over the years, I’ve worked with a variety of different young people to build youth voice. When I was younger, some people did that for me, too, despite our differences. I was an immigrant kid from the country, a rodeo rider who wore cowboy boots and corduroy pants.

Later, I was a homeless kid and then lived in a low-income neighborhood. Generational PTSD and addiction flowed easily in my family, and my social defense mechanisms were high – biting humor and cynical perspectives and many other signs.

I was not what you think. Instead, I was a dynamic, empowered and excited young person who bumped into some rough edges, was challenged to grow and change, and became who I am today. And I’m still growing and changing.

As I sit here in Seattle, I’ve just closed my second Parent Youth Connection Seminar. The young people here are generally seen and treated as disengaged, but as the brainstorm here shows, they are anything but. I would tell anyone who asked that its not what you think.

What are you engaged in?


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Youth Engagement: Start anywhere, go everywhere with every youth and every adult in every community all of the time.

How Do We Fix Adultism?

When I was asked how to fix adultism recently, I got deep! I want to share with you what I wrote:

I approach anti-adultism by addressing individual attitudes; shared cultures, and; systemic structures, and I use the systems change mantra “Start anywhere and go everywhere.”

So if you begin with individual attitudes, start anywhere and go everywhere: Read books yourself; talk frankly with youth and adults about adultism; teach others to identify and address adultism; directly challenge indifference, intransigence and apathy toward youth yourself; and so on.

If you begin with cultural transformation, start anywhere and go everywhere: Facilitate learning experiences for youth and adults; create advertising campaigns that disturb adultism where it happens; directly intervene and challenge any public instance of adultism; raise consciousness by writing and talking and practicing anti-adultism.

If you begin with systemic structures, start anywhere and go everywhere: Challenge any adultism rules and guidelines wherever you are, including schools, nonprofits, businesses, and home; talk with candidates for elected office about adultism, and stand with anyone who supports changing laws, policies and guidelines that promote adultism; create policy change proposals and legislative campaigns to address adultist rules and behaviors; promote people who serve youth taking anti-adultism classes, including teachers, youth workers, parents and others in order to fight adultism where it happens through policy change; and so on.

Ultimately, start anywhere and go everywhere, no matter what you do: Start.

 

What do you think of my response? Share your thoughts in the comment section below!

 


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Adam F. C. Fletcher speaking at the 2018 Teens Care Too Youth Summit in Vancouver, Washington

Adam Speaking at the Teens Care Too Youth Summit in Vancouver, Washington

In this video, I’m keynoting at the 2018 Teens Care, Too! Youth Summit in Vancouver, Washington. The topic of my talk, “Ownership Is Just What We Do,” reflected the summit’s theme. Centering on my personal story, I touched base on owning our stories, owning our communities and owning the future, together.

 


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Parent Youth Connections Seminar

The Parent-Youth Connections Seminar, or PYCS, is a project of the King County Superior Court with primary focus on early intervention for low-risk youth involved in the court system. PYCS provides fun, interactive seminars to low-risk youth offenders and a parent or other connected adult.

Together, youth and adults explore youth engagement, community empowerment and social change. They explore the skills, knowledge and actions needed to change their lives and the world around them.

 

 

 


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Adam Fletcher in Seattle, Washington

Adam Fletcher Advocating Youth Engagement in Communities

The crisis of disengagement facing youth today is shameful. There are so many issues youth can become active in and so many actions they can take our communities have no reason not to engage every youth and every adult everywhere all the time. But somehow, they don’t. Adam Fletcher works with nonprofits, government agencies and other organizations to build youth engagement throughout communities.

Following are Adam Fletcher’s tools for youth engagement in communities. Contact him.

 

Adam Fletcher’s Tools Supporting Youth Engagement in Communities

Adam Fletcher’s Books

  1. The Practice of Youth Engagement
  2. Facing Adultism
  3. The Freechild Project Guide to Youth-Driven Programs

Adam Fletcher’s Free Publications

  1. Youth Engagement in the Economy
  2. A Short Guide to Holistic Youth Development
  3. The Freechild Project Youth Action Guide
  4. A Short Intro to Youth Rights
  5. Youth Voice Toolkit
  6. Youth Engagement Workshop Guide
  7. Guide to Cooperative Games for Social Change
  8. Washington Youth Voice Handbook
  9. Guide to Social Change Led By and With Young People

Adam Fletcher’s Website on Youth Engagement

Adam Fletcher’s Articles

Adam Fletcher’s Services Supporting Youth Engagement in Communities

 


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Click here for Adam Fletcher’s resources onAdam Fletcher promotes youth engagement in schools

What You Need to Change the World by Adam Fletcher for adamfletcher.net

Adam Fletcher Advocating Youth Engagement in Schools

There is an engagement gap facing every school today, and Adam Fletcher can help you bridge that gap. Based in research and experience, Adam facilitates professional development for educators, training for students, project consultation for education agencies, and much more. He speaks at conferences, writes for journals and periodicals, and has authored several books.

Following are Adam Fletcher’s tools for youth engagement in schools. Contact him.

 

Adam Fletcher’s Tools Supporting Youth Engagement in Schools

 

Adam Fletcher’s Books

  1. Student Voice Revolution: The Meaningful Student Involvement Handbook
  2. The Guide to Student Voice
  3. SoundOut Student Voice Curriculum

Adam Fletcher’s Free Publications

  1. The Guide to Meaningful Student Involvement
  2. Meaningful Student Involvement Resource Guide
  3. Stories of Meaningful Student Involvement
  4. Meaningful Student Involvement Research Guide
  5. SoundOut Student Engagement Conditions Assessment
  6. Meaningful Student Involvement Idea Guide
  7. Meaningful Student Involvement Guide to Inclusive School Change
  8. Meaningful Student Involvement Guide to Students as Partners in School Change 
  9. Meaningful Student Involvement Toolbox
  10. Student Voice Toolbox
  11. Student Engagement Toolbox
  12. Barriers to School Transformation
  13. Students on School Boards
  14. United States Student Voice Directory
  15. Canadian Student Voice Directory
  16. SoundOut Lesson Plans for Student Adult Partnerships 
  17. Student Voice and Bullying
  18. Meaningful Student Involvement Planning Guide
  19. Meaningful Student Involvement Deep Assessment

Adam Fletcher’s Website about Youth Engagement in Schools

Adam Fletcher’s Articles about Youth Engagement in Schools

Adam Fletcher’s Services Supporting Youth Engagement in Schools

 

 


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Click here for Adam Fletcher’s resources onAdam Fletcher promotes youth engagement in communities

American Institutes for Research Technical Assistance Program

From 2009 to 2013, Adam consulted the American Institutes for Research (AIR) Technical Assistance Program focused on youth involvement in systems of care. Supported by SAMSHA, this project was designed by AIR to provide nationwide support for youth in foster care as they became systems advocates for transforming, sustaining and advocating change in their lives and the lives of those who came after them.

Adam consulted in many roles for AIR, including providing expert guidance for staff and grantees across the country, and co-writing a national guidance manual. He also keynoted several national gatherings, trained local grantees, and assisted in the evaluation and reporting of activities.

“Adam truly cares about people; nowhere is this more evident than in his passion for creating inclusive communities with a space for everyone. His passion for youth engagement is contagious and I appreciate his ability to challenge us be our better selves so that we can live in better communities that support and honor us all.”—Reyhan Reid, Program Coordinator, American Institutes for Research

 


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Elsewhere Online

Systems of Youth Engagement by Adam Fletcher

Systems of Youth Engagement

Our society is filled with systems. A lot of them affect youth.

Whether we’re talking about obvious systems like education, health care and juvenile justice, or less tangible systems like culture and families, its important to understand how each of these affects youth engagement.

 

Systems of Youth Engagement by Adam Fletcher

 

While I’ve worked with schools, nonprofits, government agencies and other orgs over the last 17 years, I’ve explored how and these systems operate. I’ve seen “under the hood” in dozens of communities, watched the bad and the good arise in times of crisis and seasons of apparent ease… and every time I’m reminded of the systems at work.

Wherever they’re sustainably connected, youth engagement happens in systems.

  • Sports—The youth athletics system includes rules, teams, scores, morals, codes and more
  • Culture—The cultural system all youth belong to includes obvious and not-obvious rules, behavior, attitudes and beyond
  • Work—The youth employment system exchanges goods and services for money and more

Other systems of youth engagement include school, faith, justice, health, family, civic action, social services, mental health, recreation, or other systems, ALL youth EVERY where can experience the positive, powerful potential of youth engagement. Let’s explore that together!

I’m offering a new series of training and speeches on Systems of Youth Engagement. If you’re interested in learning how I can help you, your organization or your community, call me today at (360)489-9680 or send me an email. Want to learn on your own? See the links below.

 


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The EGOsystem/ECOsystem dynamic as illustrated by Adam Fletcher
This article, “EGOsystems or ECOsystem in Education” by Adam Fletcher is available.