Federal Youth Coordination Timeline

This is a bonus for anyone interested in what is being done on the federal level to coordinate services for young people. I’m currently working with the illustrious Jonah Wittkamper on his initiative focused on creating a Presidential Commission on Youth and Intergenerational Partnerships. While I won’t go into that here, I will say that there is a lot of work to do. Here’s a timeline I created of Federal youth coordination activities in the U.S.

1909 – The first White House Conference on the Care of Dependent Children is held.
1919 – The White House Conference on Standards of Child Welfare is held.
1929 – The White House Conference on Standards of Child Welfare is held.
1935 – The National Youth Administration is created.
1936 – The Declaration of the Rights of American Youth is presented on the floor of the US Congress.
1939 – The Conference on Children in a Democracy is held.

1943 – The National Youth Administration is ended.

1950 – The White House Conference on Children and Youth is held. 
1960 – The White House Conference on Children and Youth is held. 
1970 – The White House Conference on Children and Youth is held.
1974 – The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention is created.
1990 – The Claude Pepper Young Americans Act is passed.
1995 – The Youth Community Development Block Grant is created.
2000 – The Younger Americans Act is passed.
2002 – George Bush created the White House Task Force for Disadvantaged Youth, including the Shared Youth Vision Initiative.
2005 – Helping America’s Youth initiative is created. 
2006 – The Tom Osborne Federal Youth Coordination Act is passed. 
2006 – The Task Force for Disadvantaged Youth is created. 
2006 – The Federal Youth Coordination Act is passed.
2008 – The White House issues an Executive Order lauding the success of the Helping America’s Youth initiative and the federal coordination resultant from it. 
2008 – The Federal Youth Coordination Act of 2008, HR 7004, was proposed to amend the Tom Osborne Federal Youth Coordination Act.
There are other national efforts, including the National Commission on Resources for Youth and the National Youth Alternatives Project. 
Let know what you think!
Written by Adam Fletcher, this article was originally posted to http://commonaction.blogspot.com. Learn more at adamfletcher.net!

Published by Adam

For almost two decades, Adam F. C. Fletcher has led international outreach focused on engaging people successfully. Working with thousands of youth-serving nonprofits, K-12 schools, government agencies, international NGOs and other organizations around the world, his work spans the fields of education, public health, economic development and social services, and includes professional development, public speaking, publishing, social media and more. He founded the Freechild Institute for Youth Engagement, SoundOut and CommonAction, as well as writing more than 50 publications and 500 articles. He has also established 150-plus community empowerment projects.

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