Great Poetry Series: "To Be Of Use"

This is the 20th entry in CommonAction’s “Great Poetry” Series. Marge Piercy is is the author of seventeen novels and eighteen volumes of poetry, and a critically acclaimed memoir. Born in center city Detroit, educated at the University of Michigan, the recipient of four honorary doctorates, she has been a key player in some of the major progressive battles of our time, including the anti-Vietnam war and the women’s movement, and more recently an active participant in the resistance to the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

We honor her work by featuring her spectacular work that speaks so deeply to the work of engaging people to change the world: “To Be Of Use”.

To Be Of Use
Marge Piercy

The people that I love the best
jump into work head first
without dallying in the shallows
and swim off with sure strokes almost out of sight.
They seem to be natives of that element,
the black sleek heads of seal
bouncing like half-submerged balls.

I love people who harness themselves, an ox to a heavy cart,
who pull like water buffalo, with massive patience,
who strain in the mud and the muck to move things forward,
who do what has to be done, again and again.

I want to be with people who submerge
in the task, who go into the fields to harvest
and work in a row and pass the bags along,
who are not parlor generals and field deserters
but move in a common rhythm
when the food must come in or the fire be put out.

The work of the world is common as mud.
Botched, it smears the hands, crumbles to dust.
But the thing worth doing well done
has a shape that satisfies, clean and evident.
Greek amphoras for wine or oil,
Hopi vases that held corn, are put in museums
but you know they were made to be used.
The pitcher cries for water to carry
and a person for work that is real.

Written by Adam Fletcher, this article was originally posted to http://commonaction.blogspot.com. Learn more at adamfletcher.net!

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