Adam Fletcher in Seattle, Washington

Adam Fletcher Advocating Youth Engagement in Communities

The crisis of disengagement facing youth today is shameful. There are so many issues youth can become active in and so many actions they can take our communities have no reason not to engage every youth and every adult everywhere all the time. But somehow, they don’t. Adam Fletcher works with nonprofits, government agencies and other organizations to build youth engagement throughout communities.

Following are Adam Fletcher’s tools for youth engagement in communities. Contact him.

 

Adam Fletcher’s Tools Supporting Youth Engagement in Communities

Adam Fletcher’s Books

  1. The Practice of Youth Engagement
  2. Facing Adultism
  3. The Freechild Project Guide to Youth-Driven Programs

Adam Fletcher’s Free Publications

  1. Youth Engagement in the Economy
  2. A Short Guide to Holistic Youth Development
  3. The Freechild Project Youth Action Guide
  4. A Short Intro to Youth Rights
  5. Youth Voice Toolkit
  6. Youth Engagement Workshop Guide
  7. Guide to Cooperative Games for Social Change
  8. Washington Youth Voice Handbook
  9. Guide to Social Change Led By and With Young People

Adam Fletcher’s Website on Youth Engagement

Adam Fletcher’s Articles

Adam Fletcher’s Services Supporting Youth Engagement in Communities

 


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Click here for Adam Fletcher’s resources onAdam Fletcher promotes youth engagement in schools

What You Need to Change the World by Adam Fletcher for adamfletcher.net

Adam Fletcher Advocating Youth Engagement in Schools

There is an engagement gap facing every school today, and Adam Fletcher can help you bridge that gap. Based in research and experience, Adam facilitates professional development for educators, training for students, project consultation for education agencies, and much more. He speaks at conferences, writes for journals and periodicals, and has authored several books.

Following are Adam Fletcher’s tools for youth engagement in schools. Contact him.

 

Adam Fletcher’s Tools Supporting Youth Engagement in Schools

 

Adam Fletcher’s Books

  1. Student Voice Revolution: The Meaningful Student Involvement Handbook
  2. The Guide to Student Voice
  3. SoundOut Student Voice Curriculum

Adam Fletcher’s Free Publications

  1. The Guide to Meaningful Student Involvement
  2. Meaningful Student Involvement Resource Guide
  3. Stories of Meaningful Student Involvement
  4. Meaningful Student Involvement Research Guide
  5. SoundOut Student Engagement Conditions Assessment
  6. Meaningful Student Involvement Idea Guide
  7. Meaningful Student Involvement Guide to Inclusive School Change
  8. Meaningful Student Involvement Guide to Students as Partners in School Change 
  9. Meaningful Student Involvement Toolbox
  10. Student Voice Toolbox
  11. Student Engagement Toolbox
  12. Barriers to School Transformation
  13. Students on School Boards
  14. United States Student Voice Directory
  15. Canadian Student Voice Directory
  16. SoundOut Lesson Plans for Student Adult Partnerships 
  17. Student Voice and Bullying
  18. Meaningful Student Involvement Planning Guide
  19. Meaningful Student Involvement Deep Assessment

Adam Fletcher’s Website about Youth Engagement in Schools

Adam Fletcher’s Articles about Youth Engagement in Schools

Adam Fletcher’s Services Supporting Youth Engagement in Schools

 

 


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Click here for Adam Fletcher’s resources onAdam Fletcher promotes youth engagement in communities

This is Adam Fletcher Sasse in 1992 at Omaha North High School.

Why I Think We Should Examine Our Motivations to Help Others

When I was young, I was involved in programs at a church in the low-income, predominantly African American neighborhood where my family lived.

One day when I was 16 years old, some friends and I were walking down the street when we came across a couple of shiny new vans delivering a small hoard of white kids dressed in optimistic clothes to the church.

Curious, we we asked some of the youth what they were doing. Nonchalantly, they said they were here to paint this ghetto church, pointing at our fortress of hope.

When we asked if we could help, an adult with the group told us it was their project, and they’d be doing the painting. We brought our concerns to the minister, who explained they were missionaries from another state and this was mission trip, to paint our church.

That didn’t make any sense to me then, and I spent more than a decade trying to reconcile their well-meaning intention and my sense of dejection.

As an adult, I’ve met bunches and bunches of well-meaning middle class people and white people who want to save the world without ever looking at how to empower people to save themselves. These same folks rarely examine their own complicity in oppression and the ongoing slight of snobbery in volunteerism and philanthropy.

With so many people more focused on “changing the world” today, I think it’s high time that we reflect on Gandhi’s call for us to “be the change we wish to see in the world. We each have to examine our motivation.

I’ve been writing about that process for a long time without ever offering rationale for why that matters. The story I share here is meant to show one reason.

If you’re interested, check out my PETS (Personal Engagement Tip Sheets) for practical ways to look inside yourself before you try to change the world. You might also read my poem, Missionary. One of the most powerful pieces I’ve ever read about examining our motivations is a speech given by Ivan Illich called “To Hell With Good Intentions,” where he critically examines what it means to serve others. I also recommend Paulo Freire’s last book, which pushed me to embrace my own assumptions in new ways. Its called Pedagogy of Indignation.

After that, if you want to connect about what to do next just drop me a note.

Join Me in Marin!

Adam Fletcher in Marin County

Join me today in San Raphael, California for a series of presentations!

  • This morning I’m talking with more than 300 middle school students focused on my talk, GET ENGAGED WITH PURPOSE, PASSION AND POWER!
  • Then this afternoon I’m talking with community members, including parents, nonprofit workers and others, focused on The Big Ideas in Youth Engagement. 
  • This evening I’m talking with Marin School District educators and others in the Bay Area focused on MEANINGFUL STUDENT INVOLVEMENT.

Its an exciting time, and I’d LOVE to have you along!

Check out my Facebook page for pics throughout the day and more…

New Video for The Guide to Student Voice

To help make sharing The Guide to Student Voice easier, I created a short (1 min) video that introduces the video, shares about its content, and describes the ideal audiences for it.

As a subscriber to my blog, I invite you to contact me directly with any questions, comments, concerns or ideas related to it. Thanks for reading!

 

Related Content

You Are Capable of Anything

Today, I heard an awesome new pop song from Ben Folds. He’s easily the modern Brian Wilson. Anyway, his song is called “Capable of Anything” and is performed with a chamber orchestra called yMusic.

Instead of going on about it, I want to just share the music with you. If you want a little inspiration, a little nudge or a littler reminder of just how great you are and all the spectacular things you can do, listen to this. I love this song.

Stopping Discrimination Against Children

Recently, a young person from Finland wrote to me for an interview. They wanted to discuss discrimination against children.

Following are the questions they asked and my responses. Let me know what you think in the comments section!

 

What is child discrimination to you?

Discrimination against children happens anytime adults are biased towards adults. That means that whenever our words, our actions, our thoughts, and our ideas favor adults before children, children are being discriminated against.

 

When was the last time you saw it happen? What was happening

Discrimination against children happens every single time children and adults interact. This includes almost every parent/child, teacher/student, clerk/customer and caretaker/charge relationship. Discrimination against children happens in schools, at home, in businesses, in afterschool programs, in government agencies, in courts, at the playground, on the athletics field, in neighborhoods and throughout all of our society, all of the time.
  • Discrimination against children happens in the words adults use: Jargon, insistence on manners, and saying things like “You’re in my house and you’ll follow my rules” or “You’ll understand when you’re older” or “Children are better seen and not heard.”
  • Discrimination against children happens in the actions adults take: Building schools and houses at adult heights instead of childrens’, making curriculum and tests to meet dream-up adult wants rather than genuine child needs, and corporeal punishment.
  • Discrimination against children happens in the thoughts adults have: “I’m her parent and I know best”, “I’ll do what I want done here and convince her that its right later on”, and “They’ll just have to do this now whether they like it or not” are some of the thoughts adults have.

I explore all this in-depth in my book, Ending Discrimination Against Young People.

 

Have you even been discriminated in your life? If so how?

Whether or not we acknowledge it, every single person has been discriminated against in their lifetime. Discrimination is any judgment against anybody, including those made because of our ages, genders, skin colors, socio-economic statuses, cultural backgrounds, religions and more.
I’ve been discriminated against for many reasons, including my age when I was young, and my age now that I’m older.

What are you doing to stop discrimination?

I write books and pamphlets, facilitate workshops and give speeches to help educate people about discrimination against children and youth. My books include Ending Discrimination Against Young People as mentioned a moment ago; A Short Introduction to Youth Rights; and more than a dozen others.

What are ways people can stop it everyday?

As I’ve explained here, discrimination against children is a huge thing that affects everyone. The very best thing that anyone of any age can do to stop it is to listen to themselves, watch themselves and stop themselves from discriminating against children. EVERY ONE OF US discriminates against children, including children. We should listen to our thoughts and words, and hear ourselves discriminating against children. We should watch our actions and see how we discriminate against children. If we choose the company of adults before children, we’re discriminating against children.
After we’ve seen and heard our discrimination against children, we have to ask whether we’re okay with it. If we are okay with it, we don’t have to stop it. But if we’re really not okay with it, we should confront our own discrimination against children whenever, however we can. Then, and only then, should we encourage others to do the same thing.
What do you think? Agree, disagree? Share your thoughts in the comments.

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