Adam Fletcher Advocating Youth Engagement in Schools

There is an engagement gap facing every school today, and Adam Fletcher can help you bridge that gap. Based in research and experience, Adam facilitates professional development for educators, training for students, project consultation for education agencies, and much more. He speaks at conferences, writes for journals and periodicals, and has authored several books.

Following are Adam Fletcher’s tools for youth engagement in schools. Contact him.

 

Adam Fletcher’s Tools Supporting Youth Engagement in Schools

 

Adam Fletcher’s Books

  1. Student Voice Revolution: The Meaningful Student Involvement Handbook
  2. The Guide to Student Voice
  3. SoundOut Student Voice Curriculum

Adam Fletcher’s Free Publications

  1. The Guide to Meaningful Student Involvement
  2. Meaningful Student Involvement Resource Guide
  3. Stories of Meaningful Student Involvement
  4. Meaningful Student Involvement Research Guide
  5. SoundOut Student Engagement Conditions Assessment
  6. Meaningful Student Involvement Idea Guide
  7. Meaningful Student Involvement Guide to Inclusive School Change
  8. Meaningful Student Involvement Guide to Students as Partners in School Change 
  9. Meaningful Student Involvement Toolbox
  10. Student Voice Toolbox
  11. Student Engagement Toolbox
  12. Barriers to School Transformation
  13. Students on School Boards
  14. United States Student Voice Directory
  15. Canadian Student Voice Directory
  16. SoundOut Lesson Plans for Student Adult Partnerships 
  17. Student Voice and Bullying
  18. Meaningful Student Involvement Planning Guide
  19. Meaningful Student Involvement Deep Assessment

Adam Fletcher’s Website about Youth Engagement in Schools

Adam Fletcher’s Articles about Youth Engagement in Schools

Adam Fletcher’s Services Supporting Youth Engagement in Schools

 

 


You Might Also Be Interested In…

 

Click here for Adam Fletcher’s resources onAdam Fletcher promotes youth engagement in communities

Engage or Die

Its cliche to say we live in trying times. But suffering is never cliche, and social justice isn’t a fad.

The Challenge

More than ever, people need to connect and make meaning of their own life. If we were merely passive recipients of a pre-made society, we wouldn’t need connections beyond those that are obviously beneficial to us, and any meaning in our lives could be dictated to us from a form.

We’re not just consumers though. Despite what some schools, business leaders and elected officials tell us, our society is not a product for anyone to consume. Instead, we are all actively making our lives right now – no matter what the rat race looks like for any of us.

Unfortunately, that idea of people-as-consumers may be winning right now. We eat food that’s pre-made; memorize lessons from curriculum that’s mass manufactured; follow regulations intended to standardize our everyday lives; and buy things that weren’t made for individuals, but for consumers.

 

Transformation Is Required

More than ever, its become obvious that things have to change. We must engage or die. Over the last decade, I’ve researched engagement throughout our society to learn that the places with the most meaningful, most sustainable connections are the most engaged. I believe we must take action to engage as many people as possible everywhere we can, as often as we can, or we face individual, cultural, and ultimately, social death. The end of our society. The end of our communities. The end of our lives.

Our communities, classrooms, cultures and homes have to be places of active, meaningful and authentic engagement. Our souls must be lifted and our hearts connected through determination and intention, and our volitions need to be called to a higher place. Instead of working from a place of crass consumerism, we should acknowledge the place of movement calling our hands and feet beyond apathy and into action. All of this must be sustained throughout the future of our species.

If we don’t do something different, our hearts will rot on the vine, our muscles will wither from atrophy, and our minds will shrink from starvation. For some people that’s already happened; for others its happening right now. We have to intervene, prevent and empower people to do things differently right now.

Three Crises

There are countless areas where we must connect in our world. Neighborhoods require our attention; governments need us. Faith communities rely on engagement; social change is sacrosanct in my book.

Here are three crises in particular where we face the ultimatum to ENGAGE OR DIE.

  1. Education: If we don’t activate everyoneeverywhere as active learners right now, we face the whole system decimation of education throughout our society. While a lot of attention is given to public schools right now, the reality is that higher education, community centers and nonprofits are suffering right now, and things will only get worse. We must engage in education or we will die.
  2. Family: Our families are suffering for many reasons. A lot of people are talking about the elimination of the middle class and the effects that’s having on families. However, we must also acknowledge the roles of the human family; our larger communities; and the need to acknowledge nontraditional families. We must engage with the notion of family or we will die.
  3. Health: I don’t work out enough. Sure, I walk a lot and eat healthy, stay away from drinking and staying out too late. Our health is a lot more than any of that though: instead, its the ecology that surrounds each of us. Food, water, shelter, sleep and oxygen are essential. The rhythms, cultures, thoughts, emotions and abilities around us are part of our health, too. If we don’t engage in health, we will die.

If you’re interested in having a conversation about what we can do about this, get in touch with me. I would like to facilitate workshops with all kinds of nonprofits, give talks at a variety of conferences, and reach into the hearts and minds of people everywhere who want to engage or die. Contact me for more details.

 

Related Articles

The Crisis of Disengagement

In places throughout our society, people are wrestling with a challenge that feels insurmountable: People just don’t care, they aren’t showing up, or they’re not doing what we need them to, what they’re supposed to do, or even what they want to do.

 


Causes of Disengagement

First obvious in schools, in the 1970s this was originally identified as a dropout problem. After struggling through early community action agencies, Rock the Vote type projects, and national service programs, in 1999 a sociologist named Robert Putnam put a face to the problem when he published Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community

Putnam successfully diagnosed the problem with society’s social capital, which is a metaphor for the interactive networks people keep with other people who live and work around each other. Since we’re constantly exchanging these visible and invisible gestures in conscious and unconscious ways, social capital is what allows our society to actually work.

 


What Disengagement Causes

Wonder why it feels like our society doesn’t actually work? According to Putnam, its because social capital isn’t being circulated like it used to be. Given the emergence of anarchistic capitalism and hyper-libertarianism, I believe we’re reaching a fever pitch and revealing the real problem, which I am calling the Crisis of Disengagement.

Psychologists talk about this as a phenomenon that needs addressed through intrinsic-extrinsic motivation theory and goal theory, and the need to investigate the gaps between people, as well as what possible ways to maintain or stimulate peoples’ motivations to exchange social capital. They believe environments can be intentionally maintained to enhances the self-concept, social efficacy, and a sense of volition as well as self-determination to circumvent the demise of social capital. And all that’s fascinating to me, and I’m going to continue studying it to learn more.

 


Essential Learning

However, I think we need an accessible approach to the Crisis of Disengagement for everyone, not just academics. So let me name and define what I think we’re talking about here:

  • Engagement is any sustained connection anyone has to anything in the world around them and within themselves.
  • Disengagement is the absence of sustainability in our connections.

That said, the Crisis of Engagement is a solvable problem, much like poverty and war. As Nelson Mandela said,

“Overcoming poverty is not a task of charity, it is an act of justice. Like Slavery and Apartheid, poverty is not natural. It is man-made and it can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings.”

Disengagement is a solvable problem.

My work is about helping YOU solve the Crisis of Engagement. Check out the rest of the Personal Engagement Tip Sheets to learn more!

 


Related Articles


Adam Fletcher is available to train, coach, speak, and write about Personal Engagement across the US and Canada. Contact him to learn about the possibilities!

Today’s Poem: Requim for Antiq

Requim for Antiq

The Garvey Projects were never a Sunday walk
but parents still
strolled through
ball shots and beatbox
Uneasy rhythms of daily
living

Laughing, vibrant
and full of
life
Antiq Hennis was a baby
a boy
in a stroller
strolling

Livonia Avenue and Bristol Street
on the downbeat
Brownsville
Suddenly, a release
trigger popped
ball dropped
and Antiq was dead

Covered in blood
Gina Gamboa’s baby
dead
shot in the head
four bullets
meant for his dad

Hospital blues
not Hill Street Blues
this is real

Antiq’s godmother
kissed him,
“doubled over in grief”
and cursed the thief by saying,
This baby
was just a baby

But was he really?
Would he have
grown up
to become a man
to start that band
to make a plan
that would save
us all?

We’ll never know
because Antiq Hennis
is dead
God rest his soul.

Read about the death of Antiq Hennis.

 

 

 

Suffering Love Laughing At Myself is the first poetry book of Adam Fletcher Sasse and is available at https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1492244651/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=thefreechildp-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1492244651&linkId=f44cc486f1762084454de9227854ae90